Industrial Facility
 
 

02

03

04

05

Project

Ten Key Calculator

 

Client

IDEA, Japan

 

Production

2007 -

 

The Ten Key Calculator was the first product released as part of a long-standing relationship with IDEA. The project design was led by Ippei Matsumoto. It called for a calculator that could also connect to a computer through a USB connection - relieving some of the stress associated with typing digits using a standard qwerty keyboard. The design resurrects the tactility of original computer keys into the calculator, creating a very useful key stroke. The result is a calculator that’s become a piece of universal design with its popularity for both young and old.

Awards

Best Work Product, ID Magazine, 2007

Designs of the Year, Shortlisted, Design Museum London, 2008

 

Exhibitions

Less and More, the Work of Dieter Rams, San Francisco, 2012

Turn, Twist and Branch Off, Aram Store, London, 2011

Some Recent Projects, Design Museum London, 2008

 

Films

RETAIL FACILITY Ten Key Calculator

 

International Sales

Buy at RETAIL FACILITY

 
 
 

02

06

05

01

Project
An Alarm

 

Client
IDEA Japan

 

Production

2010 —

 

An Alarrm is an effective analog alert watch that adopts the iconic alarm clock analogy as its starting point. When the alert is activated, instead of sound a small motor creates a vibration on the wrist, similar to a mobile phone. Its intelligence is in how simple it is to set and use – the alert is set simply by moving the alarm hand to the desired time and lifting the alert button. This interface was also borrowed from the alarm clock, to avoid ‘layers’ of settings that would have otherwise created complexity that’s normally found in alarm watches. 

Exhibitions
Less and More, the Work of Dieter Rams,

San Francisco, 2012

Turn, Twist and Branch Off, Aram Store, London, 2011

Some Recent Projects, Design Museum London, 2008

 

Films

RETAIL FACILITY An Alarm Vibration Watch

 

International Sales

Buy at RETAIL FACILITY

 
 
 

02

08

07

04

Project

Bell Clock

 

Client

IDEA Japan

 

Production

2009 —

 

Even though the digital world has made analogue alarm clocks appear historical, people still are attracted to them for their loudness and simple interface. Bell was designed to help alarm clocks take up a more desireable position, for people who struggle with the layers of information required to set digital clocks. The design moved the bell component to form part of the clock’s body, helping to save components, simplifying the appearance, and creating a much louder ring within a small footprint. Bell features a snooze control, a molded numeral display that avoids the necessity for printing, and LED illumination. It is louder than a mobile phone, a desk clock or a watch. Its loudness is also reflected in the choice of colours: Fire Bell Red, Bicycle Bell Chrome, and Doorbell Black.

The battery door is easily pulled off for replacement, as well as serving as a stand for greater stability when the alarm is ringing. When the alarm is activated, the LED light also turns on, to help to see its display on dark winter mornings.

 

Awards

Best Product, GQ Magazine, 2009

New & Notable, ID Magazine, 2009

 

Permanent Collections

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

Exhibitions

Less and More, the Work of Dieter Rams, San Francisco, 2012
Turn, Twist and Branch Off, Aram Store, London, 2011
Some Recent Projects, Design Museum London, 2008

 

Films

RETAIL FACILITY Bell Alarm Clock 

 

International Sales

Buy at RETAIL FACILITY

 
 
 

08

03

04

05

02

Project
Jetlag

 

Client
IDEA Japan

 

Production
2007 —

 

Industrial Facility examined the travel alarm clock - a product that receives little attention yet continues to be popular among older generations. The design was informed not by shape but by interface. The ambition was to create a digital alarm clock with such simplicity of use that it would render a manual unnecessary. By involving two digital displays - one for time, the other for alarm - that are always visible, adjusting the display becomes intuitive. The reverse of the clock has both, a lock button for travelling (to stop the display inadvertently changing) and a battery compartment that uses no screws. Other functions include display illumination and an alarm/snooze button that also incorporates the speaker.

Every detail, from the interface, to the size and material were considered and resulted in a clarity rarely seen in these types of products.

"It's not often you get the chance to develop a product from scratch. It came about from the plain frustration of trying to set a digital alarm clock for travelling. The answer came during a trip to Tokyo, where the hotel had a clock with two displays. This simple idea removed a lot of complexity in using it, even though it added more. However, adopting this simple idea proved hard to achieve for mass production at an affordable scale, because it required a new microchip along with the costs of programming. The overwhelming advantages proved irresistible to us and IDEA. The proportions were also based on half the size of a passport. We all feel it epitomises one of the primary roles of design - making things better from inside out."

Exhibitions
Less and More, the Work of Dieter Rams, Design Museum London, 2011
Turn, Twist and Branch Off, Aram Store, London, 2011
Some Recent Projects, Design Museum London, 2008

 

Films

RETAIL FACILITY Jetlag Travel Alarm Clock

 

International Sales
Buy at RETAIL FACILITY

 
 
 

02

03

04

05

Project
Lite Plug

 

Client

IDEA Japan

 

Production

2008 —

 

The studio finds it more and more rewarding to examine the types of objects where design is either ignored or heavily compromised, so it was our choice to examine the world of emergency torches. It’s a particularly popular product in Japan, due to the country's earthquake proximity. The existing configurations of these types of product are often illogical and also visually too brash for something that spends most of its life in a wall socket. 

The Lite Plug is plugged into a wall socket to become a nightlight, with the front lens pushed down to reveal both a light and motion sensor. As the room gets darker, a single LED emits a soft glow. When someone walks past, all 3 LED's light up, making the room a little brighter.

In an emergency, the Lite Plug senses power failure with all LED's turning on. The nightlight can then be pulled out to become a torch, with the front lens being pushed up for extra brightness.

 

Exhibitions

Less and More, the work of Dieter Rams, Design Museum London, 2011

Turn, Twist and Branch Off, Aram Store, London, 2011

Some Recent Projects, Design Museum London, 2008

 

International Sales
Buy at RETAIL FACILITY