Industrial Facility
 
 

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Project

Dryerhair

 

Client

Wallpaper Handmade

 

Production

2010 (not in production)

 

When it comes to hair styling, the styling of the hairdryer itself is usually an afterthought, its design having remained curiously static over the years. To redress this, Wallpaper asked Industrial Facility to rethink the ubiquitous blow-drying tool and to examine all its familiar workings. Looking at how the object fits into a room or cupboard, the studio focused on added functionality and the storage of the cable. The Dryerhair incorporated a translucent cavity into which the cable neatly coiled when not in use, with the plug doubling as a lid. The switch, meanwhile, was tucked out of sight in the base of the handle.

Exhibitions

Wallpaper Handmade, Brioni, Milan, 2010

 

Further Reading

Wallpaper Handmade

Fast Company

 
 
 

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09

Project

Cantilever

 

Client

Yamaha, Japan

 

Production

2008 (not in production)

 

Cantilever was an electronic piano that used the qualities of synthetic material and minimal presence to counter any perception of inferiority in digital sound output, compared with the classical string piano. It represented a new typology that brought the electronic piano into modernity. Cantilever's two simple volumes could only be achieved with electronic components, and created a new type of form that started to give pride back to this type of product. Functionally, the top surface could be gently pushed back to reveal the piano keys, with the 89th key serving as a remote control for playback and navigation. 

The challenge in Industrial Facility's eyes was to strip away all metaphor and iconography that had previously plagued this type of product, and to create a digital piano on its own merits. The image of a faux grand piano was removed. What you were left with is the space to create something monumental on a digital level. Piano-ness was achieved not with image, but with feeling. Shortly after its public release Yamaha retreated from its development due to economic conditions.

 

Exhibitions

Salone Internationale del Mobile, Milan, 2008

 

Further Reading

Yamaha Design Exhibition, 2008

 
 
 

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Project

Coffee Maker

 

Client

Muji, Japan

 

Production

2006 -

 

An opportunity arose at Muji, to investigate an affordable small capacity coffee maker that would involve a stainless steel insulated pot, made possible by a new relationship with Toshiba. With the help of Kazushige Miyake who had a sound knowledge of the principles of coffee machine manufacture, we proposed a cylindrical tower, purposefully ignoring existing componentry, and instead being informed by the landscape of use, namely the kitchen. A cylinder meant that it could rightly sit in a corner or on a central counter, resembling the types of items already found in a kitchen. 

The design was presented as a simple cardboard tube to explain its concept. It was accepted on the spot. This was followed with proposals for all of the mechanics, water filtration, and in particular, a concept for ‘wrapping’ the water resorvoir around the coffee filter. The design went on to become one of Muji’s most popular products with its customers, and continues to be in production with minor improvements made in 2010.

 

Awards

IF Hannover Gold Award, 2007

 

Exhibitions

Love & Money, Ozone Gallery, Tokyo, 2006

Some Recent Projects, Design Museum London, 2009

Design East, Osaka, 2010

 

International Sales

Muji, Japan

 

 

 
 
 

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Project
Fan
 

Client

Muji, Japan
 

Production

2006 — 2010
 

Cooling fans are one of those objects that often find themselves in the middle of a room – where all sides are seen. And it is clearly apparent that with most of these types of products, as soon as they are introduced into a room, the feeling or atmosphere becomes sad and unfortunate. To stem this problem as much attention was paid to the back of the product, as to the front. Under significant component constraints, much of the design work was a process of careful negotiation with engineers, to ensure that the principles of simplicity important to Muji were maintained – for instance the fan motor and gear system had to be re-configured so as to obtain a perfectly smooth cylinder, expressing the force of a motor, reminiscent to a jet engine.

The remote control rested in the base when not in use, similar to a puzzle piece. Adjustable heights from 84cm to 104cm, with control settings for speed, direction and rhythm – a function that modulated air flow similar to a breeze.

 

The design proved to be a best seller for Muji and it allowed them to invest in a smaller version, that was added to the range in 2008.
 

Awards
IF Hannover Award, 2007
 

Exhibitions

Some Recent Projects, Design Museum London, 2008