Industrial Facility
 
 

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Project

Surround Sound Eyewear

 

Client

Royal National Institute for the Deaf

 

Production

2005 (not in production)

 

Regardless of sight capabilities, glasses have become as popular as watches, having been absorbed into accessorised culture, so it is conceivable that someone who is hard of hearing but with perfect eyesight would prefer to wear glasses, even though the lenses prescriptive benefits are not involved. However, this project was not simply thought of as a way to overcome aesthetic stigmas. Technologically, the product followed the experiments of Professor Marinus Boone of Delft University and his notion of superdirective beamforming as the basis for a highly directional hearing aid. By involving a set of four microphones on both side-armatures, it increased hearing capability dramatically and gave much better speech intelligibility than conventional hearing aids. The result was a type of 3 dimensional hearing, similar to that found in certain animals such as coyotes.

Hearing glasses have existed before. But they disappeared primarily because of the combination of two functions that were articulated in an awkward, in-cohesive and problematic manner. Instead, Surround Sound Eyewear made an attempt to create a more holistic object not intended to hide the hearing aid, but to incorporate it with Professor Boone’s superdirectivity concept.

 

Exhibitions

Hearwear, 2006, V&A Museum, London

Design and the elastic, 2008, MoMA, New York

Beijing Biennal, 2012, Beijing

 

Further Reading

V&A Hearware: The Future of Hearing

 
 
 

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Project

Flower Pot Stand

 

Client

SZ Magazine, Germany

 

Production

2012 (not in production)

 

For the second edition of international DIY projects, commissioned by German national magazine SZ, Industrial Facility designed an elevated flower pot using affordable and locally available parts. Three garden stakes use the constrained tension between a terracotta flower pot and its base to keep the plant up. One stake is left longer as a place to attach a plant label. The stand can be used indoors and for outdoors, the terracotta base can be eliminated by pushing the stakes into a grass lawn.

The design raises the familiar flower pot from its negligible existence on the ground, to a more graceful eye height without requiring alteration to the parts themselves.


Downloads

Instructions

 

Further Reading

SZ Magazine

 
 
 

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01

Project
Plinth

 

Client

Established & Sons / V&A Museum

 

Production

2012

 

Plinths I and II are made from Corian, a performance material usually associated with counter tops due to its durability, non-porosity and seamlessness. In this example the design uses the V&A museum courtyard as the context for the bench, rather than shaping material merely to make an isolated piece for visual interest. The two Plinths share the same design, but are of different heights and lengths; when placed together they create an opportunity for people to complete the sculpture.

Exhibitions

Bench Years, Victoria & Albert Museum, London, 2012

Interieur, Kortrijk, Belgium, 2011

 

Films

Bench Years

 
 
 

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Project

V Tent

 

Client

Louis Vuitton

 

Production

2012

 

Originally developed for the Wallpaper Handmade project, the V Tent is a collaboration with Louis Vuitton whose origins were in the service of travel. In fact, in its early history Louis Vuitton provided tents for explorers with function and quality as prerequisites for their success. For this commission, Industrial Facility revisited the Tent by referencing early Viking tents, and early Louis Vuitton bags. Both shared simple fabric constructions with the tents often involving a roof attached to the entrance. With the V Tent, the entrance is on the long side that can be lifted up to extend shelter – supported by a wooden pole. The result is a traditional construction, but with small alterations and details that re-interpret the Tent typology.

 

Exhibitions

Wallpaper Handmade, Brioni, Milan, 2012

 

Further Reading

Wallpaper Handmade

 
 
 

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Project

Cycle Shirt

 

Client

Margaret Howell, London

 

Production

2010 -

 

Cycle Shirt is a collaboration between clothing designer Margaret Howell and Industrial Facility.

The designers share a similar approach to design, paring away the inessential to find the purely useful, and shaping it with character through detail. Margaret Howell says 'Shirts are like people, a simple basic form, but with infinite variations of detail that make individuality. The life of a piece of clothing starts with its purpose, and its character lies in the details.'

The intention was clear from the start, that the shirt should reflect the busy and urban experiences of Sam Hecht, who spends most of his time on two wheels. The idea to create back pockets came up after investigating historic cycle racing jerseys which had a pocket for maps. This idea was translated into tailoring, turning up the tail of a classic shirt to create a divided pocket. The outcome was a pale blue cotton shirt, pre-washed, with minimal front detailing. An extra pocket on the left sleeve holds a travel card. 

Exhibitions

Margaret Howell plus Sam Hecht, A Cycle Shirt, Margaret Howell, London, 2011

 

Films

Sam Hecht in interview with Disegno Magazine

 

Further Reading

Margaret Howell